Monday, September 7, 2015

Interview: Static Daydream

Fredericksburg, VA's Paul Baker (ex-Skywave and Ceremony) and Jamie Casey are not only a couple in life but also a couple in music. Their debut self-titled album was released on August 28th via Saint Marie and Moon Sounds Records. If you're into taking a dive in noise pop waters dipped in distorted guitars and reverb, then don't hesitate to jump! Static Daydream's album has just the thing for you. And if you're interested in getting to know them better, then read on!
After not being in Skywave and Ceremony, did you ever consider stopping making music?
Paul: I considered not releasing any music after each of those groups, but I never imagined not making music. It's what I enjoy, despite the inspiration coming and going sometimes. That's okay with me, though. I don't feel the need to force it, and I'll never release anything that I don't really believe is worth releasing.
How did 'Static Daydream' come about? And what was your reaction when you realized Jamie can sing so well?
Paul: I left the band Ceremony for various reasons and I wanted a name that wasn't so confusing, for one thing. It was wonderful to realize that Jamie can sing so well, for sure, but I already had a lot of music that I was working on when her abilities were made obvious to me. I guess that's why she doesn't appear on so many songs we've released so far, but I hope she'll contribute a lot more in the future.
Jamie: Thank you! I've always liked to sing, but had never considered singing on any recordings until I met Paul. I'm naturally kind of an introvert so I think it was hard for him to talk me in to doing it at first, but it's gotten easier every time. We support each other and he is able to put me at ease. I'll keep contributing as long as Paul keeps writing great songs! If daydreaming requires 'a short-term detachment from one's immediate surroundings', why is yours 'static'?
Paul: I just liked the sound of it, it describes our music, and maybe in retrospect it's a slight nod to The Misfits.
Who else helped you in the making of the album?
Paul: Jake Reid helped immensely in the making of this album. I think I've said it before, but without his help I don't think it would have ever happened. He's got the great combination of knowledge and creativity that I would think anyone would want to have on their side. I consider myself very fortunate to have him as a friend and a collaborator, without a doubt.
Would you say that one of your dreams has come true with the release of your debut album?
Paul: I think I feel good about this album, but it doesn't feel like a debut, really. Even though it is sort of a "solo album," I really don't like to think of it that way. I'd rather give thanks to Jamie and Jake for making it something much better than anything I could have done alone.
Jamie: This was never something I envisioned myself doing before I met Paul. I lost my father to pancreatic cancer about 7 years ago and he loved to sing, so he always wanted me to pursue this. I think he would be very proud of me for stepping out of my comfort zone and I owe Paul a great debt of gratitude for encouraging me.
Do you have a favorite song on the album?
Paul: No, I really can't answer that. Each song has its place, I think.
Jamie: I think the album is best experienced as a whole, but "The Only One" is extra special to me for obvious reasons. What are your music influences? And what have you been listening to lately?
Paul: I would guess my influences are fairly obvious, like Slowdive, The Jesus and Mary Chain, and The Cure. There are other things, though, like Hank Williams Sr, Lee Hazelwood, Dusty Springfield, and Bo Diddley, as examples. I'm a huge fan of girl groups like The Crystals, The Shangri-La's and The Ronettes. I also listen to Kraftwerk a lot, and The Misfits and The Ramones. I don't know, it's all over the place. I recently found out about We Miss The Earth, and I'm enjoying their music a lot. Really, there are too many to name, and I don't want to run down a list and forget anyone. Just go search for things, there's a lot of good music out there.
Jamie: My taste in music is all over the place, too. I would say that my two greatest influences as far as female vocalists are Rachel Goswell from Slowdive and Sharin Foo from The Raveonettes.
I know a lot of people (myself included) would like to see you play live. Do you see that happening any time soon?
Paul: Thank you, but I'm not sure. Jamie and I have a long way to go before we start playing shows. The first thing I'd have to do is remember how to play our songs. I'm working on new songs now, and I can barely remember how those go.
How hard do you think it is for young musicians to become successful and (maybe) make a living out of their music?
Paul: I have no idea, but I'd imagine it's quite difficult, especially given that music seems to be the form of art or entertainment or whatever that is considered fair to be stolen online. It's just the reality, and it's unfortunate, but clearly some groups or artists are thriving, so maybe there's a way. I don't rely on it, so maybe I'm not the right person to ask.
Do you have a motto that guides you in life?
Paul: "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Ghandi
Jamie: Mine is a poem by Walt Whitman- "The untold want, by life and land ne'er granted, Now, Voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find." 

 You can stream Static Daydream's album on Bandcamp or Soundcloud and buy it here

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